Cleveland Cavaliers Release Their Intro Video For The Highly Anticpated 2014-15 Season

I want to say the anticipation surrounding this season may dwarf LeBron’s rookie year, with that being said, every little thing the Cavs do seem to be documented and their intro video is no exception.. Check it out below!

 https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=925932764100793

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Cleveland Bears Witness. Again.

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After yesterday’s “Decision,” Clevelanders took to downtown much like they did after the last “Decision,” but this time, the vibe was totally different.

There were random chants of “LBJ!”, high-fives to strangers clearly united through the struggles of being a Cleveland sports fan.

In 2010, I was as hurt as anyone was, when I read that LeBron was determined to bring a championship to Cleveland, when I saw the way the city received him wherever he was, our love for him was rooted in something deeper than basketball. For as long as I can remember, it was always difficult bringing sports talent to Cleveland. Sure, we had a few big names pass through, but they were either in the twilight of their career (Rison, Hershiser, Kemp, etc.), or we groomed them in to superstars and then they soon departed. That hard truth suggested that the only way we were going to retain any talent here, was if we cultivated it ourselves. And so we did.

In 2003, our prayers were answered. The drafting of LeBron translated to hope. Not just for our struggling basketball team but, for the city, the region as a whole to rally around. Having grown up in the area, we rested easy on the fact that he knew what it meant to be a Cleveland sports fan, he knew how important his presence was, he was our hero.

For seven years, the city experienced a kind of excitement I had never seen before. We were perennial contenders and for once, even those dreaded self-loathing Clevelanders couldn’t deny our potential.

So when he left, well… You saw it on tv.

There was a reaction like no other, people felt betrayed, abandoned.. Being the product of a blue-collar region, we knew that he respected hard-work, resilience, being hard nosed, etc.. When he took the “easier way” to a ring, people denounced him.

Fast forward to yesterday, our reaction to the decision 2.0 wasn’t us getting back on the bandwagon, it was us celebrating the fact that “‘Bron gets it.”

Reading that letter, it’s clear, he understands what he means to this region.. Anywhere else, he’s just the best basketball player in the league. Here?! His value here is immeasurable.

As a city/region, our biggest import is people. Believe it or not, LeBron’s return is as much a part of our “brain gain,” as anyone elses’ arrival here.

Long story short, this is bigger than basketball. It’s about Cleveland and our region. Just look.

Welcome home LeBron.

LeBron Chooses “Cleveland Over Everything”

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As told to SI’s Lee Jenkins:

Before anyone ever cared where I would play basketball, I was a kid from Northeast Ohio. It’s where I walked. It’s where I ran. It’s where I cried. It’s where I bled. It holds a special place in my heart. People there have seen me grow up. I sometimes feel like I’m their son. Their passion can be overwhelming. But it drives me. I want to give them hope when I can. I want to inspire them when I can. My relationship with Northeast Ohio is bigger than basketball. I didn’t realize that four years ago. I do now.

Remember when I was sitting up there at the Boys & Girls Club in 2010? I was thinking, This is really tough. I could feel it. I was leaving something I had spent a long time creating. If I had to do it all over again, I’d obviously do things differently, but I’d still have left. Miami, for me, has been almost like college for other kids. These past four years helped raise me into who I am. I became a better player and a better man. I learned from a franchise that had been where I wanted to go. I will always think of Miami as my second home. Without the experiences I had there, I wouldn’t be able to do what I’m doing today.

I went to Miami because of D-Wade and CB. We made sacrifices to keep UD. I loved becoming a big bro to Rio. I believed we could do something magical if we came together. And that’s exactly what we did! The hardest thing to leave is what I built with those guys. I’ve talked to some of them and will talk to others. Nothing will ever change what we accomplished. We are brothers for life.  I also want to thank Micky Arison and Pat Riley for giving me an amazing four years.

I’m doing this essay because I want an opportunity to explain myself uninterrupted. I don’t want anyone thinking: He and Erik Spoelstra didn’t get along. … He and Riles didn’t get along. … The Heat couldn’t put the right team together. That’s absolutely not true.

I’m not having a press conference or a party. After this, it’s time to get to work.

When I left Cleveland, I was on a mission. I was seeking championships, and we won two. But Miami already knew that feeling. Our city hasn’t had that feeling in a long, long, long time. My goal is still to win as many titles as possible, no question. But what’s most important for me is bringing one trophy back to Northeast Ohio.

I always believed that I’d return to Cleveland and finish my career there. I just didn’t know when. After the season, free agency wasn’t even a thought. But I have two boys and my wife, Savannah, is pregnant with a girl. I started thinking about what it would be like to raise my family in my hometown. I looked at other teams, but I wasn’t going to leave Miami for anywhere except Cleveland. The more time passed, the more it felt right. This is what makes me happy.

To make the move I needed the support of my wife and my mom, who can be very tough. The letter from Dan Gilbert, the booing of the Cleveland fans, the jerseys being burned — seeing all that was hard for them. My emotions were more mixed. It was easy to say, “OK, I don’t want to deal with these people ever again.” But then you think about the other side. What if I were a kid who looked up to an athlete, and that athlete made me want to do better in my own life, and then he left? How would I react? I’ve met with Dan, face-to-face, man-to-man. We’ve talked it out. Everybody makes mistakes. I’ve made mistakes as well. Who am I to hold a grudge?

I’m not promising a championship. I know how hard that is to deliver. We’re not ready right now. No way. Of course, I want to win next year, but I’m realistic. It will be a long process, much longer than it was in 2010. My patience will get tested. I know that. I’m going into a situation with a young team and a new coach. I will be the old head. But I get a thrill out of bringing a group together and helping them reach a place they didn’t know they could go. I see myself as a mentor now and I’m excited to lead some of these talented young guys. I think I can help Kyrie Irving become one of the best point guards in our league. I think I can help elevate Tristan Thompson and Dion Waiters. And I can’t wait to reunite with Anderson Varejao, one of my favorite teammates.

But this is not about the roster or the organization. I feel my calling here goes above basketball. I have a responsibility to lead, in more ways than one, and I take that very seriously. My presence can make a difference in Miami, but I think it can mean more where I’m from. I want kids in Northeast Ohio, like the hundreds of Akron third-graders I sponsor through my foundation, to realize that there’s no better place to grow up. Maybe some of them will come home after college and start a family or open a business. That would make me smile. Our community, which has struggled so much, needs all the talent it can get.

In Northeast Ohio, nothing is given. Everything is earned. You work for what you have.

I’m ready to accept the challenge. I’m coming home.

Source.

Photo Recap: Talk & Taste w/ Rich Paul

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As advertised, one of the most powerful agents in sports, Rich Paul was the featured speaker at last night’s Talk & Taste Event @ Jezebel’s Bayou.. Although he didn’t answer any LeBron free-agency questions, he did provide a great deal of insight and drew a detailed road-map to his found successes.

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The Cleveland-native peppered his convo to the captivated crowd with praise to his family, neighborhood roots, time at Benedictine (including a few name-drops lol) and the fabric of the city as a whole.

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TONIGHT: Talk & Taste | A Wine Tasting Networking Event Presents Rich Paul As Featured Guest Speaker

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Talk & Taste. a monthly wine-tasting networking event will be welcoming Rich Paul as their featured speaker TONIGHT at Jezebel’s Bayou.


Who is Rich?!


Rich Paul, Founder and CEO of Klutch Sports Group, has been recognized as one of the sports industry’s most powerful agents. In a short period of time he has quickly climbed the corporate ladder in player representation both on and off the court.

Rich Paul began his career at LRMR (LeBron, Rich, Maverick, Randy) Marketing, a partnership created with some of his childhood friends. This was only the beginning of a very long journey. The next stop was at Nike where he learned many skills that would propel his career to the next level. His mastery of the ins and outs of the sports marketing industry landed him an opportunity to work for Creative Artists Agency. During his tenure Paul recruited and managed many top NBA players. These relationships would fuel his next move. In September of 2012, Rich Paul began his own sports agency, Klutch Sports Group.

He currently represents several top NBA players; Four time MVP LeBron James, Cleveland Cavaliers standout forward Tristan Thompson and rising point guard Eric Bledsoe just to name a few. He has also managed to ink lucrative deals with Coca Cola, Beats by Dre, Samsung and many other companies. The journey to the top has been a tough road. But with hard work and dedication Rich Paul discovered a recipe for success. His foresight and understanding of the ever-changing Sports Business has made Klutch Sports Group a force to be reckoned with.

Rich Paul was born and raised in Cleveland Ohio. He attended Benedictine high school, where he was a 2 time Ohio state champion.